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43 South Main Street

Montgomery, PA  17752

(570) 547-0480

fax (570) 547-0498

info@valleyrehabilitation.com

frequently asked questions



DO I NEED A PRESCRIPTION / REFERRAL FROM MY DOCTOR TO RECEIVE PHYSICAL THERAPY?
Pennsylvania law allows patients to self-refer to physical therapy, which means that treatment can often be provided without a prescription or referral from a doctor.  For further information about this, please call our office or visit our Direct Access page.



HOW MANY TIMES WILL I NEED TO ATTEND PHYSICAL THERAPY?

Although every client receives a customized treatment program based on individual needs, it is generally recommended that each client attend therapy 1-3 times per week in order to maximize the benefits of therapy.  If you have questions about this please ask your therapist for details during your first visit.

  

HOW MUCH WILL I HAVE TO PAY FOR MY CO-PAY, CO-INSURANCE OR DEDUCTIBLE? 

Out-of-pocket costs vary from plan to plan, regardless of employer or insurance company.  In order to determine your out of pocket costs, we will need your insurance identification number to verify the specifics of your policy.  We ask you to remember that we do not control or set the out of pocket costs; these costs are dictated within the policy selected by your employer.  For additional information or assistance in determining your out of pocket responsibility, please  call our office!



I HAVE AN INJURY THAT REQUIRES P.T.  MY CO-PAY IS $50 PER SESSION; I AM NOT WORKING AND CANNOT AFFORD THAT MUCH.  CAN I SET UP A PAYMENT PLAN?

Out-of-pocket costs continue to rise, and we field this question regularly.  If it makes it more feasible for you to get the care you need, we are happy to work with you to control your out-of-pocket costs and also set you up with a payment plan.  All payment plans must be established in writing.  For additional information, please contact Melissa Jameson. 



I DON'T HAVE INSURANCE.  HOW MUCH DOES PHYSICAL THERAPY COST IF I PAY CASH?

We believe that it is important for everyone to have access to the healthcare that they need, even when money is tight.  For this reason, we offer a cash rate, as well as payment plan options, for those who do not have insurance.  Please call for additional information. 



I WORK UNTIL 6:00, BUT MY 15 YEAR OLD SON NEEDS THERAPY.  CAN HE WALK TO YOUR FACILITY AFTER SCHOOL AND GET TREATMENT WITHOUT A PARENT ACCOMPANYING HIM?

A parent or guardian must accompany new clients under the age of 18 to their first appointment, but their presence is not necessary after that unless there are extenuating circumstances.  If you are not able to accompany your child to their first appointment, please call us to discuss this. 



MY DOCTOR SAYS THAT I SHOULD WALK IN A POOL OR DO AN AQUATIC PROGRAM FOR THE ARTHRITIS IN MY KNEES.  IS THAT SOMETHING I CAN DO AT VALLEY REHAB?
Valley Rehab does have a therapy pool, but it is big enough to accommodate only pediatric clients.  It is not set up to accommodate adult clients.  There are several other rehab facilities in the Susquehanna Valley that offer indoor aquatic therapy, as well as other facilities that offer programs such as water aerobics and open swims.  If you need help connecting with one of these facilities, please call our office; we would be happy to help you located the facility that is either closest to you and/or best suited for your needs.



MY DAUGHTER DID NOT "QUALIFY" FOR PHYSICAL THERAPY SERVICES AT SCHOOL, BUT HER DOCTOR IS INSISTENT THAT SHE NEEDS PHYSICAL THERAPY.  WILL SHE "QUALIFY" FOR OUTPATIENT PHYSICAL THERAPY?


Determining need and qualification for school-based physical therapy can be confusing, as there are some differences in the way that therapy is carried out in the educational setting versus the outpatient setting.  Under IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), children who have IEPs to address educational needs are eligible to receive physical therapy as a related service if a physical therapy evaluation demonstrates gross motor deficits that impair or limit their access to their educational environment.   It is not unusual for a student with very mild motor delays to not demonstrate the degree of deficit or impairment necessary to qualify for school based physical therapy as a related service. 

In situations where a student has no need for specialized educational instruction and does not have an IEP, but has been diagnosed with a disability or impairment that physically impedes or limits their ability to access or function their educational environment, a 504 plan might be implemented by the school district to provide support services necessary for the student to appropriately access or better function within their educational environment  Local Educational Agencies are required to include school based physical therapy as part of a 504 plan if a student's impairment or limitation in accessing their educational environment must be significant or severe; students with lesser impairments often do not receive school-based physical therapy as part of a 504 plan. 


These same qualifying regulations do not apply to outpatient therapy services.  We often encounter youngsters with mild gross motor delays or temporary developmental setbacks related to medical conditions or accidents who do not qualify for preschool or school based services, but are very appropriate for outpatient therapy services.  Of course, there are lots of children who receive both school-based and outpatient physical therapy services.  If you would like more information about our outpatient pediatric physical therapy  services, drop us an email or call the office; we are more than happy to answer your questions!



WHAT IS A NEUROGENIC BLADDER?


Neurogenic bladder is characterized by lack of bladder control due to brain damage, spinal cord injury or injury to nerves directly controlling the bladder.  It is commonly seen in conditions such as Spina Bifida, Cerebral Palsy, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease, Stroke, Alzheimer's Disease, Encephalitis, brain or spinal cord tumor.  It is important to note that only a physician can diagnose neurogenic bladder, and that neurogenic bladder is not always present with these conditions; if neurogenic bladder is not present, but incontinence persists, it is possible that physical therapy be helpful in addressing the incontinence.  If you or your child have one of these conditions, but question whether a neurogenic bladder is present, we encourage you to consult your physician and request appropriate testing for a definitive diagnosis.    

 



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